SPARK Talks 2019: Week 1

Do you believe God is a healer? Do miracles happen? Why do some people get healed and others don’t? This week we have three very different stories about miracles and healing.

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LENA SCHULER:
Welcome to Crossroads.

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LENA SCHULER:
We're so glad to have you tuning
in for our Spark Talk Series.

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LENA SCHULER:
You know sometimes the daily grind
can just wear on us,

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LENA SCHULER:
right? And so our hope is that
in the midst of this series, in

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LENA SCHULER:
the midst of this hour that
you're spending with us something

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LENA SCHULER:
is sparked in you where you have
some new ideas and new fire

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LENA SCHULER:
moving forward.

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LENA SCHULER:
And so to kick us off we're
actually going to spend some time

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LENA SCHULER:
worshipping together. Worship

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LENA SCHULER:
is just an opportunity for us
to put prayers to song.

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LENA SCHULER:
And so if you don't believe
these words yet, that's totally

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LENA SCHULER:
okay, but I just am asking
right now that God would actually

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LENA SCHULER:
spark something in you in
the midst of these songs.

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LENA SCHULER:
Hey, I love worshipping alongside of
you from anywhere you might

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LENA SCHULER:
be right now. If

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LENA SCHULER:
you enjoyed those songs, you enjoyed
spending time with God in

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LENA SCHULER:
that way, you can
do that more often.

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LENA SCHULER:
You can catch all of those
songs on Spotify or on YouTube

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LENA SCHULER:
through the Crossroads
Music channels. And

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LENA SCHULER:
it's a great way to deepen
your relationship with God during

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LENA SCHULER:
the week by having conversations
with him through songs.

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Well, hey, I'm Lena Schuler
and I'm the Crossroads Anywhere.

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Community Pastor.

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So glad to have you joining
us for church today from anywhere

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you might be.

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We are going to get to
hear a few Spark talks today.

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Talks that should ignite something in
us to have a lasting

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impact, some new ideas that go
beyond our normal daily grind.

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It's gonna be good.

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But before we do that, I want
to let you know of some things

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that are happening around the church,
some ways for you to get

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involved, some ways for
you to get connected.

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One of the things that we're
doing as a whole church is

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something called Summer Social.

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It's purely a
social this summer.

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Regardless of where you live, we
want to give you opportunity

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to meet with other people who are
part of your church who live

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near you, around you, maybe even
might be your neighbor and you

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don't even know it yet.

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So if you head to the
Crossroads website you can check out

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Summer Social and the
locations that that's happening.

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We have this happening across all
parts of the Cincinnati and

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Lexington areas and part of
lots of Anywhere communities around

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the country. Ans so you can get

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all of that information
on the Crossroads website.

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You can also chat with
us on the website.

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We'd love to help you get hooked
up to the community that is

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closest to you, wherever you
might be right now.

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You know I don't know about you,
but when I am in a line

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anywhere I tend to pull
out my phone, right?

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Like we just immediately want to
pull out our phones and not

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really pay attention to what's
happening around us, kill some

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time. I am an
avid Instagram user.

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I love scrolling through social media
and I waste so much time

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doing that.

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And yet there is a better way for
me to spend my line time than

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Instagram, and that's actually
in the Crossroads app.

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If you go and download the
Crossroads Anywhere App right now,

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in there there's constantly new
content that's being added and

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curated and things for you to do
that might have a little bit

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more substance than
your Instagram feed.

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And I often find something in
there that I immediately want to

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share with a friend.

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I want to send them an
article or share a podcast. And

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so I can't help but think of
friends and family who would love

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the things that I'm
reading and watching.

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And it's really simple and easy
to do that from the Crossroads

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App. So, download that today and
start using that in your

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downtime when you're trying to
kill some time, when you'd

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usually go for Facebook or Instagram,
maybe switch it up and go

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for the Crossroads
App this week.

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Well, you know, in the Bible
God says that when we're faithful

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with the little He
gives us more. When

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we're faithful with the resources that
He's given us, He gives

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us more resources to
be faithful with.

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And one of the ways that my
husband Nick and I consistently try

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to be faithful with the resources
that God's given us, the

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money that he's entrusted us with,
is we want to be generous

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with that money.

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We say to God, "We trust You
to take care of us financially and

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we want to be faithful with
the money that You've given us,

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because we want more from You.

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We want You to
trust us with more."

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And so maybe today you want to
take a step in telling God you

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trust him by giving a little
bit of money away, by being

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faithful with the money
that He's given you.

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If you want to do that,
you can head to Crossroads.net/give

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and just sign up for a one
time gift or maybe even a recurring

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gift. And today we get to
hear from a few different speakers

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that I think are gonna
spark something special in you.

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Let's check it out.

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KIM BOTTO:
I grew up loving the Beatles.

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KIM BOTTO:
In that song All You Need Is
Love, I believed that to be

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KIM BOTTO:
true, that love is all you need.

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KIM BOTTO:
And then as I started to grow
and mature I realized, is that

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KIM BOTTO:
really true, All You
Need Is Love?

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KIM BOTTO:
Is that all?

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KIM BOTTO:
And then I would try to love
somebody and I really didn't know

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KIM BOTTO:
how or I would try to love a
kid and the kid didn't know how to

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KIM BOTTO:
receive my love.

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Here at Crossroads we have five
to six thousand kids and

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students a week.

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So as you can imagine I've
seen all kinds of things.

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And as much as I deeply love
these kids, some of them have

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challenging behaviors.

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And some of it is due
to the fact that they've experienced

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trauma.

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So you may wonder, how
does trauma affect a kid?

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So imagine this: you're driving your
car and out of nowhere a

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vehicle runs a stop sign and
almost hits you, or maybe they

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actually do hit you.

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When that happens, the stress
hormone cortisol is released.

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It makes our heart race, our
palms sweat, and we become hyper

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focused on one thing and
that's protecting ourself, surviving.

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When kids live in fear or
experience trauma, they have these

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same symptoms.

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And trauma can
affect people differently.

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Trauma can be a one time event,
or it can happen over and

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over, day after day.

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Trauma is really anything that's messed
up or scary that our

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brains simply can't process.

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So, when a kid is
abused or neglected, that's trauma.

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When kids have to go live
with their grandparents because their

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parents have overdosed or gone to
jail or simply can't care for

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them anymore, that's trauma.

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When children are separated from
their birth parents, whether

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it happens in the hospital when
they are born or many years

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later, that's trauma.

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But I used to look at
these kids when they're challenging

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behaviors and I think,
"What's wrong with you?

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You are in a
safe environment now. You

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have parents that love you."

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Or I'd look at their parents and
I'd go, "You just need to be

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tougher on your kid.

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You need to discipline them.

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You need to train them up.".

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And then I got to know these
kids and I realized how wrong and

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judgmental I was.

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One little guy I met, he
had a little plastic grocery bag

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filled with all of his
treasures, which was adorable.

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But when he brought it to
church it was super annoying, because

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he wouldn't share any of
his things with anybody.

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He didn't even want the other
kids to look in his bag.

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So of course, the kids
were really curious. And

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when they started to get close to
the bag he'd get angry and

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sometimes he'd lash out
at them physically.

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So one day I said to him,
"Hey there, Little Buddy, how about

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you leave the bag
at home next week?".

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He then told me that because
he had been in multiple foster

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homes and sometimes had to
leave quickly that he'd had

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treasures that were left behind that
he never ever saw again.

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And this was a smart kid. And

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he said, "That's not going
to happen to me again."

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So he got his little grocery bag
and he put all of the

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important things in his
life in this bag.

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That little boy, he wrecked me.

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Because it was through him that
God called me to advocate and

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fight for these kids because this
little boy, he wasn't a bad

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kid.

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He was hurt and he was afraid
and his brain was just trying to

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process what was going
on around him.

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He was scared.

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The most important thing to him
was protecting himself and his

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possessions. And this little boy, he's
the least of these that

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Jesus talks about.

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And what we have learned through
science, when somebody lives in

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a state of chronic fear, like
this little boy, it actually

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changes the architecture of our
brain, that then changes our

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ability to cope and
to think logically.

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Experts have also learned that
the best therapeutic experiences,

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they don't always
happen in therapy.

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Actually they often happen
in healthy, safe relationships.

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Dr. Bruce Perry is a
psychiatrist who's worked with thousands

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of kids who've
experienced trauma.

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And he

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says:

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So kids are often harmed
through relationship and then it's

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through relationship that they
can begin to heal.

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But I know being in a
relationship with a kid who has

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experienced trauma is emotionally
and physically exhausting.

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It's much easier to say,
"Hey, you know what?

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There's programs and government
agencies for that.

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I'm just going to
let them handle it.".

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But that's why God created
the family and community.

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It's for us to handle it, because
kids must be in a nurturing

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relationship to thrive
and to heal.

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And that's why I am so thankful to
be in a community and on a

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team that's passionate about reaching
these kids and their

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family.

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A team that doesn't quit
when it gets hard.

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Here at Crossroads we have kids
and students that come who are

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kicked out at other places. And

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they're welcomed here with
open arms. Because

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the teams here they want to
create a safe environment for them

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to hear about a father
who will never leave.

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To hear about a dad who knows
them and has a great plan for

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their life.

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And I just want to say if
you're here and you're in that

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fight, well done.

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God is pleased with the
work that you're doing.

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and I know it
is a difficult journey.

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I also know that when we do this,
we get to see the miracle when

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a kid begins to feel safe and
starts to be able to receive

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love.

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I also know that God is not
finished working through us to reach

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more of these kids.

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We aren't all called to care
for these kids in the same

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way. For my family, we were called
to take kids into our home

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and into our family 24/7.

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You might be feeling the
nudge to do that.

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And maybe that's not you.

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And that's totally okay.

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When we look at currently there
are over 400,000 kids in foster

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care across the nation, and
many more who have experienced

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trauma. And it
can seem overwhelming.

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And you might be sitting there
going, "I can't fix that."

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You're right, you can't fix it.

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But what we can do is we
can take a step towards one.

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I was recently talking to a young
woman and a couple weeks ago

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she wasn't a mom.

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But she got a phone call and
she was told that there was a

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relative of hers that was no longer
able to take care of their

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kids. And this brave woman
said, "I'll do it.

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I'll take her kids in." And

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so people kept asking her, "What
can I do to help?"

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And she'd go, "I don't know."

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Because she was a brand new mom,
she had no idea what she

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needed. And what we could do in
this situation is we can take a

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step towards her and
mow her lawn.

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00:25:27.560 --> 00:25:30.320
We can take a step towards her
family and say, "I'm going to

231
00:25:30.320 --> 00:25:33.680
bring dinner to you this week so
you and your husband can take

232
00:25:33.680 --> 00:25:35.720
a walk or a nap."

233
00:25:36.950 --> 00:25:39.620
We can also for other families
that are struggling, we can take

234
00:25:39.620 --> 00:25:42.980
a step towards them and offer
to take their kids bike riding

235
00:25:43.170 --> 00:25:45.450
and burn off some energy and
give mom and dad a break.

236
00:25:47.050 --> 00:25:51.670
Or we can be a safe,
nonjudgmental place for them to process

237
00:25:51.940 --> 00:25:54.910
their difficult emotions
and experiences.

238
00:25:56.410 --> 00:25:59.260
We can also commit to
praying for them regularly.

239
00:25:59.710 --> 00:26:02.290
And if we do
that, let them know.

240
00:26:02.470 --> 00:26:04.330
Send them notes,
send them texts.

241
00:26:05.170 --> 00:26:08.830
And every time you do
this, we're making a difference.

242
00:26:08.860 --> 00:26:11.350
We are taking a step
towards the least of these.

243
00:26:11.980 --> 00:26:15.970
A quote that really drives me
is from Josh Shipp who spent

244
00:26:15.970 --> 00:26:18.370
years in foster care as a kid.

245
00:26:18.880 --> 00:26:19.600
And he says:.

246
00:26:24.520 --> 00:26:26.050
I have seen that firsthand.

247
00:26:27.310 --> 00:26:30.130
I have a 17 year old I
was hanging out with recently and she

248
00:26:30.130 --> 00:26:34.570
said to me, "I just need somebody
to remind me who I am because

249
00:26:34.570 --> 00:26:35.770
sometimes I forget."

250
00:26:36.250 --> 00:26:41.260
So I get to tell her,
"You can do hard things. You

251
00:26:41.260 --> 00:26:42.520
are empathetic. You

252
00:26:42.520 --> 00:26:43.750
are beautiful.".

253
00:26:44.320 --> 00:26:47.800
I can also remind her to
clean up her social media.

254
00:26:49.820 --> 00:26:52.340
And I get to be a part
of her life and her story.

255
00:26:52.730 --> 00:26:54.960
I want more people
to experience that.

256
00:26:56.940 --> 00:26:59.320
Remember the kid with the
bag that I talked about?

257
00:26:59.920 --> 00:27:05.160
Well, every day his adoptive parents
told him and showed him

258
00:27:05.340 --> 00:27:06.930
that they weren't
going anywhere.

259
00:27:07.650 --> 00:27:11.340
And his leaders at church, they
found a safe and secure place

260
00:27:11.580 --> 00:27:12.960
to store his treasures.

261
00:27:13.890 --> 00:27:15.850
And one day he left
his bag at home.

262
00:27:17.040 --> 00:27:20.780
And then later the contents of
his bag ended up being scattered

263
00:27:20.780 --> 00:27:24.680
throughout his house, because he was
beginning to feel safe and

264
00:27:24.680 --> 00:27:26.120
he knew that he was home.

265
00:27:26.990 --> 00:27:30.650
And his story isn't over, but
because of the challenges he's

266
00:27:30.860 --> 00:27:35.060
--because of his experiences, he
may always have challenges,

267
00:27:35.480 --> 00:27:39.380
but he now has relationships and
people around him that he can

268
00:27:39.380 --> 00:27:40.160
count on.

269
00:27:40.910 --> 00:27:41.900
So you know what?

270
00:27:42.470 --> 00:27:44.930
Maybe the Beatles weren't
that far off.

271
00:27:45.470 --> 00:27:51.310
Love is needed, but it's the
kind of love that might introduce

272
00:27:51.310 --> 00:27:52.750
mess into our life.

273
00:27:54.220 --> 00:27:55.410
We might get hurt.

274
00:27:56.950 --> 00:28:01.210
We might grow in ways that
we never imagined possible in when

275
00:28:01.210 --> 00:28:07.840
we take a step towards that one,
we can be the difference that

276
00:28:07.840 --> 00:28:11.170
enables that kid to
be a success story.

277
00:28:12.640 --> 00:28:13.230
Thank you.

278
00:28:13.230 --> 00:28:13.240
(applause)

279
00:28:13.240 --> 00:28:13.250
(music)

280
00:28:27.050 --> 00:28:29.150
ANDREA:
Music has always been
my main thing.

281
00:28:30.920 --> 00:28:34.610
ANDREA:
But it's hard to find the quiet
space to do that with three

282
00:28:34.610 --> 00:28:35.360
ANDREA:
boys at home.

283
00:28:37.100 --> 00:28:41.270
So I started painting last year with
my kids and I just fell in

284
00:28:41.270 --> 00:28:41.750
love with it.

285
00:28:44.330 --> 00:28:48.800
I realized in painting that I had
forgotten how to just play and

286
00:28:48.800 --> 00:28:50.060
discover freely.

287
00:28:51.230 --> 00:28:55.000
Like I had grown up
and traded freedom for rules.

288
00:28:56.000 --> 00:28:58.910
But there are no rules in
art and I love that.

289
00:29:00.990 --> 00:29:04.950
Painting with watercolors also requires
a lot of observation, so

290
00:29:04.950 --> 00:29:07.140
it ends up being
really meditative for me.

291
00:29:08.160 --> 00:29:12.000
Like I walk away from it with
a quieter mind and with that

292
00:29:12.300 --> 00:29:14.700
childlike delight of play.

293
00:29:17.250 --> 00:29:19.740
To be inspired I look to nature.

294
00:29:21.700 --> 00:29:24.940
I love creating pieces that might
spark beauty and joy in

295
00:29:24.940 --> 00:29:26.170
someone else's space.

296
00:29:28.320 --> 00:29:30.420
God is the ultimate artist.

297
00:29:31.020 --> 00:29:36.060
His work is unnecessarily
beautiful, extravagant, and sometimes

298
00:29:36.060 --> 00:29:36.930
downright bizarre.

299
00:29:37.830 --> 00:29:43.020
And as many things as I might
question or doubt about God, His

300
00:29:43.020 --> 00:29:45.150
creativity is not one of them.

301
00:29:46.500 --> 00:29:51.000
I'm Andrea and through painting God has
sparked in me the joy of

302
00:29:51.000 --> 00:29:51.750
discovery.

303
00:29:55.130 --> 00:29:59.290
OTIS WILLIAMS:
The answer is you've
got to be committed.

304
00:30:01.400 --> 00:30:04.220
OTIS WILLIAMS:
The question is what does it
take to change my life.

305
00:30:04.850 --> 00:30:07.190
Hello, Crossroads, My name is Otis
Williams and I want to tell

306
00:30:07.190 --> 00:30:10.940
you a story about the one
word that changed my life forever.

307
00:30:11.570 --> 00:30:15.680
There was a time when I
was totally terrified of heights. And

308
00:30:15.710 --> 00:30:18.020
one of my life's philosophies is
whatever you don't face will

309
00:30:18.020 --> 00:30:19.040
stay in your face.

310
00:30:19.490 --> 00:30:23.150
So I decided to face and conquer
this dream killer once and for

311
00:30:23.150 --> 00:30:23.470
all.

312
00:30:23.900 --> 00:30:28.550
And to defeat this enemy I decided
to do what any normal person

313
00:30:28.550 --> 00:30:32.090
who had a high fear of heights
would do: I joined the military

314
00:30:32.090 --> 00:30:34.100
and I volunteer to
become an Airborne Paratrooper.

315
00:30:37.040 --> 00:30:37.160
[laughter]

316
00:30:37.160 --> 00:30:40.280
So I got a jump school and
jump school is three weeks long.

317
00:30:40.550 --> 00:30:43.550
You've got ground week, tower
week, and jump week. During

318
00:30:43.550 --> 00:30:47.360
ground week you do stuff
on the ground. Tower

319
00:30:47.550 --> 00:30:50.050
week you do stuff
in the tower. And

320
00:30:50.060 --> 00:30:52.910
if you pass and you meet
the requirements for ground week and

321
00:30:52.910 --> 00:30:55.960
tower week, you move
on to jump week.

322
00:30:56.540 --> 00:30:59.990
Now something strange and phenomenal
happens at jump week, the

323
00:30:59.990 --> 00:31:03.470
black hats, those are the instructors
at jump school, they get

324
00:31:03.470 --> 00:31:04.640
very nice.

325
00:31:04.880 --> 00:31:08.450
And so I'm wondering, "Why aren't they
being so nice to us now?"

326
00:31:08.780 --> 00:31:12.740
because doing ground week and tower
week they are the complete

327
00:31:12.770 --> 00:31:14.180
embodiment of evil.

328
00:31:14.390 --> 00:31:17.990
They are mean, they are toxic,
they're trying to do everything

329
00:31:17.990 --> 00:31:21.590
they can legally do to get
you to give up and quit.

330
00:31:21.950 --> 00:31:25.910
And then it dawned on me: We're
getting ready to jump out of a

331
00:31:25.910 --> 00:31:29.900
perfectly good aircraft for our very
first time, so they want

332
00:31:29.900 --> 00:31:32.390
the trauma, Kim, to be very low.

333
00:31:34.370 --> 00:31:34.580
[laughter]

334
00:31:34.580 --> 00:31:36.710
So it's Monday morning
of jump week.

335
00:31:36.920 --> 00:31:38.480
We find ourself in the hangar.

336
00:31:38.720 --> 00:31:41.510
We're putting our parachutes on,
getting geared up. Black

337
00:31:41.510 --> 00:31:43.400
hats are going around, they're
checking, they're making sure

338
00:31:43.400 --> 00:31:44.690
everything's okay. And

339
00:31:44.690 --> 00:31:48.530
then a black hat yells, he
says, "Gentlemen, make sure all the

340
00:31:48.530 --> 00:31:50.790
furniture is in one room."

341
00:31:51.740 --> 00:31:54.290
And I'm thinking to myself, "Why
is this guy talking about

342
00:31:54.290 --> 00:31:55.730
furniture at a time like this?

343
00:31:55.940 --> 00:31:56.630
I don't understand.".

344
00:31:56.660 --> 00:32:01.580
But anyway we get suited up, the
thumbs up come, we take off and

345
00:32:01.580 --> 00:32:05.930
we're down the pathway getting ready
to go on our our nice

346
00:32:05.930 --> 00:32:06.350
journey.

347
00:32:06.800 --> 00:32:10.490
So our very first jump is
gonna be out of a C130.

348
00:32:10.490 --> 00:32:12.680
We load the monster of this
aircraft from the back, the back

349
00:32:12.680 --> 00:32:13.220
comes down.

350
00:32:13.580 --> 00:32:14.630
We get on, we load it.

351
00:32:14.660 --> 00:32:17.330
We sit on the sides of it
and we wait till everybody gets

352
00:32:17.330 --> 00:32:19.490
there. And then this
thing wheels up.

353
00:32:19.520 --> 00:32:23.330
We taxi down the runway and
then before you know it, boom,

354
00:32:23.330 --> 00:32:25.910
we're in the air, off
into the great blue yonder.

355
00:32:26.390 --> 00:32:31.160
So it's about 15-20 minutes where
we reach what we call jump

356
00:32:31.250 --> 00:32:36.590
altitude. And now jump altitude for
combat jump is 1250 feet.

357
00:32:36.980 --> 00:32:39.800
So it's not a lot of time
if something goes wrong for you to

358
00:32:39.800 --> 00:32:40.970
take corrective measures.

359
00:32:41.510 --> 00:32:45.740
So at this time the doors on
the C130 open, the wind rushes in,

360
00:32:45.740 --> 00:32:48.170
slaps you across the face, wakes
you up, as if you were

361
00:32:48.170 --> 00:32:52.100
sleeping. And then you've got black
hats one on each side, they

362
00:32:52.100 --> 00:32:54.380
stick their head out of the
door and they're looking for the

363
00:32:54.380 --> 00:32:55.670
drop zone. So

364
00:32:55.670 --> 00:32:57.890
they're looking, they come
back in, and they

365
00:32:57.890 --> 00:33:03.430
say, "Ten Minutes!" So you rock as
you repeat it, you go, "Ten

366
00:33:03.440 --> 00:33:05.120
minutes, 10 minutes." That's

367
00:33:05.120 --> 00:33:07.150
to let everybody know this thing is
about to go down, it's for

368
00:33:07.150 --> 00:33:07.520
real.

369
00:33:07.940 --> 00:33:10.670
So then they disappear out the
door again, they look for the

370
00:33:10.670 --> 00:33:11.750
drop zone. They

371
00:33:11.750 --> 00:33:14.690
come back, they say,
"Five minutes!" What

372
00:33:14.690 --> 00:33:15.200
do you do?

373
00:33:16.130 --> 00:33:16.490
You rock.

374
00:33:16.520 --> 00:33:16.820
Let's go.

375
00:33:17.000 --> 00:33:18.660
Five minutes, five minutes.

376
00:33:18.680 --> 00:33:19.280
There you go.

377
00:33:19.640 --> 00:33:23.090
So then they disappear one last
time, looking for the drop zone.

378
00:33:23.510 --> 00:33:25.640
They come back in., "Drop

379
00:33:25.640 --> 00:33:27.490
zone coming up. First

380
00:33:27.490 --> 00:33:29.190
through the pass stand up.

381
00:33:29.480 --> 00:33:31.780
Hook up, shuffle to
the door." So

382
00:33:31.780 --> 00:33:33.890
you've got ten on this side of
the plane, ten on this side of

383
00:33:33.890 --> 00:33:34.280
the plane.

384
00:33:34.520 --> 00:33:36.140
They stand up, hook
up static lines.

385
00:33:36.160 --> 00:33:36.950
Everything's ready.

386
00:33:37.190 --> 00:33:41.000
Then you hear this, "First
man, stand in the door."

387
00:33:42.140 --> 00:33:42.860
Nobody moves.

388
00:33:46.130 --> 00:33:46.310
[laughter]

389
00:33:46.310 --> 00:33:50.110
So the black hat says, "First
man, stand in the door."

390
00:33:51.370 --> 00:33:52.950
Nobody moves. So

391
00:33:53.030 --> 00:33:54.400
then he looks directly at me.

392
00:33:54.430 --> 00:33:56.920
He says, "Son, you're
the first man.

393
00:33:57.190 --> 00:33:59.170
Get in the door." And

394
00:33:59.170 --> 00:33:59.950
I'm in the door.

395
00:34:00.310 --> 00:34:03.220
So he's on the side of me
and then he gives me this speech.

396
00:34:03.700 --> 00:34:06.750
He says, "You're going to be the
first one out of this aircraft.

397
00:34:07.180 --> 00:34:09.070
You are going to set the
example for the rest of his

398
00:34:09.070 --> 00:34:11.470
paratroopers. I need you to
watch that light. When

399
00:34:11.470 --> 00:34:14.290
that light turns green, you
will exit this aircraft.

400
00:34:14.320 --> 00:34:17.890
In other words, when this plane lands
you will not be on it.

401
00:34:18.040 --> 00:34:19.640
Have I made
myself perfectly clear."

402
00:34:19.980 --> 00:34:23.320
"Yes, Sergeant." [laughter]

403
00:34:23.320 --> 00:34:23.590
So I'm watching the light,
right? (beeping sound effect)

404
00:34:23.590 --> 00:34:30.160
Bam, it turns green, out the door
with a nice foot in the rear

405
00:34:30.340 --> 00:34:31.000
to help me out. [laughter].

406
00:34:31.750 --> 00:34:37.420
So I'm falling between 20
and 25 feet per second.

407
00:34:37.870 --> 00:34:39.200
So, it's a nice clip.

408
00:34:39.850 --> 00:34:43.900
And I look up and everything is
fine until I look up because I

409
00:34:43.900 --> 00:34:50.170
look up and I notice that I
have what the military calls is a

410
00:34:50.230 --> 00:34:53.840
malfunction. In other words
my shoot wasn't open.

411
00:34:54.590 --> 00:35:00.190
And so at that altitude I
could see the ambulance leaving and

412
00:35:00.190 --> 00:35:01.990
coming to where I'm
supposed to land.

413
00:35:02.530 --> 00:35:04.960
And I'm like, "That's not a
good thing right there." Right?

414
00:35:06.310 --> 00:35:09.970
So I start depending on my
Airborne training and I start

415
00:35:09.970 --> 00:35:13.780
bicycling. At that point you can
see the black hats on the

416
00:35:13.780 --> 00:35:16.630
ground, they're grabbing megaphones,
anything they can and

417
00:35:16.630 --> 00:35:18.140
they're saying, "Faster!".

418
00:35:19.300 --> 00:35:22.720
And I'm thinking, "Dude, I'm giving
her all I got, Captain.

419
00:35:23.020 --> 00:35:25.510
I mean I'm bicycling as fast
as I can." And so

420
00:35:25.510 --> 00:35:26.770
I'm bicycling, I'm
bicycling. And

421
00:35:26.770 --> 00:35:28.990
all of a sudden I start turning,
this is a good thing, right?

422
00:35:29.140 --> 00:35:29.590
Very good.

423
00:35:29.680 --> 00:35:34.090
So I'm turning and I'm turning and
bam all of a sudden my chute

424
00:35:34.090 --> 00:35:35.920
opens and I'm like,
"This is awesome.".

425
00:35:36.280 --> 00:35:41.470
Then I clearly understood what
the sergeant was talking about

426
00:35:41.770 --> 00:35:44.650
when he said make sure all
your furniture is in one room,

427
00:35:44.920 --> 00:35:46.780
because mine was not.

428
00:35:47.390 --> 00:35:49.610
Anyway, I hit the
ground really hard.

429
00:35:49.640 --> 00:35:50.080
Bam.

430
00:35:50.350 --> 00:35:52.900
The medics are there, they're
checking me out making sure

431
00:35:52.900 --> 00:35:53.680
everything's okay.

432
00:35:53.980 --> 00:35:56.620
They were absolutely amazed
I didn't break anything.

433
00:35:57.070 --> 00:35:59.200
One of the black hats is there
and he says, "Son, how you

434
00:35:59.200 --> 00:36:01.140
doing?" I'm like,
"I'm all right.

435
00:36:01.180 --> 00:36:01.900
I'm doing pretty good.".

436
00:36:02.230 --> 00:36:03.280
He says, "Do you
feel pretty good? You

437
00:36:03.280 --> 00:36:03.540
feel good?"

438
00:36:03.570 --> 00:36:04.480
"Yes, Sargent, I feel great. "He

439
00:36:04.480 --> 00:36:07.480
says, "All right, gather your shoot
and let's go back to the

440
00:36:07.480 --> 00:36:09.570
hangar and get ready
for another jump today."

441
00:36:09.730 --> 00:36:11.200
I'm like, "Excuse me, today?"

442
00:36:12.040 --> 00:36:12.220
[laughter]

443
00:36:12.220 --> 00:36:13.600
He was like, "Yes, today."

444
00:36:13.600 --> 00:36:15.340
I'm like why -- why today?

445
00:36:15.730 --> 00:36:19.780
And he says, "Because we're
expecting bad weather tomorrow and

446
00:36:19.780 --> 00:36:23.290
we got to get as many jumps in as
we can so we can get you guys

447
00:36:23.290 --> 00:36:25.090
to graduate by Friday."

448
00:36:25.390 --> 00:36:26.530
And I'm like, "Oh, my God.".

449
00:36:26.860 --> 00:36:27.490
I gather all my stuff.

450
00:36:27.520 --> 00:36:29.140
We're back in the hangar
redoing the whole thing.

451
00:36:29.560 --> 00:36:32.590
Now my second jump
was absolutely flawless.

452
00:36:32.620 --> 00:36:33.670
It was wonderful.

453
00:36:34.000 --> 00:36:35.350
Total different from
the other one.

454
00:36:35.770 --> 00:36:40.240
After I exited the aircraft I'm
descending at a nice rate, I

455
00:36:40.240 --> 00:36:42.450
can sip lattes, all that
kind of great stuff, right?

456
00:36:42.970 --> 00:36:45.520
I am able to see for miles.

457
00:36:46.420 --> 00:36:48.580
It's a state of bliss.

458
00:36:48.930 --> 00:36:52.210
And in this state of bliss I
clearly heard God say to me, "Look

459
00:36:52.210 --> 00:36:52.390
up.".

460
00:36:53.750 --> 00:36:58.070
So I look up and then He
says, "Can you get back in that

461
00:36:58.070 --> 00:37:00.740
aircraft?" And the
answer was no.

462
00:37:01.580 --> 00:37:05.660
And He said, "Now you know what
it takes to change your life:

463
00:37:06.140 --> 00:37:09.450
commitment." You see ladies and
gentlemen here's what I

464
00:37:09.450 --> 00:37:14.900
believe: that the blessings that God has
for you and me live on

465
00:37:14.900 --> 00:37:18.050
the other side of
doubt and fear. And

466
00:37:18.050 --> 00:37:21.260
to get on the other side
of doubt and fear, it takes

467
00:37:21.260 --> 00:37:25.940
commitment. It takes giving
everything you've got, holding

468
00:37:25.940 --> 00:37:26.840
nothing back.

469
00:37:27.170 --> 00:37:29.630
It's taking all your chips, pushing
them to the center of the

470
00:37:29.630 --> 00:37:32.060
table and saying, "I'm
all in." It

471
00:37:32.060 --> 00:37:36.050
is when your ship reaches the shore,
you give the order to burn

472
00:37:36.050 --> 00:37:39.110
the boats and you say either
I die or I win.

473
00:37:39.530 --> 00:37:43.670
It is counting the cost and
jumping out of the aircraft any

474
00:37:43.670 --> 00:37:46.940
way. It's to get
to the other side.

475
00:37:47.780 --> 00:37:51.290
Now I know that level of commitment
may be a little scary for

476
00:37:51.290 --> 00:37:51.920
some of you.

477
00:37:52.790 --> 00:37:55.400
But let me leave you with
this, a little word of encouragement

478
00:37:55.400 --> 00:37:56.480
from God's Word. In

479
00:37:56.480 --> 00:38:01.850
Philippians, in that book God's word
reminds us that we can do

480
00:38:01.910 --> 00:38:04.880
all things through Christ
with strengthens us.

481
00:38:05.890 --> 00:38:10.930
So here's the command I'm leaving
you with: Commit, make the

482
00:38:10.930 --> 00:38:15.520
jump, and go get what God has for
you and I'll see you on the

483
00:38:15.520 --> 00:38:17.350
other side of doubt
and fear. Airborne

484
00:38:17.350 --> 00:38:17.770
all the way. Hoot! (music)

485
00:38:34.440 --> 00:38:36.800
JEREMY AFFELDT:
When I put on this uniform, I
drive to the ballpark every day.

486
00:38:37.190 --> 00:38:39.260
JEREMY AFFELDT:
This just feels like I've been
doing it for a long time.

487
00:38:40.880 --> 00:38:45.170
ANNOUNCER:
Since joining the team in 2009,
Jeremy Annfeldt has been an

488
00:38:45.170 --> 00:38:47.360
ANNOUNCER:
integral part of
the Giants bullpen.

489
00:38:48.430 --> 00:38:48.870
COMMENTATOR:
That's a good hook right there.

490
00:38:51.030 --> 00:38:53.120
JEREMY AFFELDT:
You know I don't start, I dow't
throw seven innings, I don't hit

491
00:38:53.120 --> 00:38:54.440
JEREMY AFFELDT:
homers, I don't steal bases.

492
00:38:54.890 --> 00:38:57.710
JEREMY AFFELDT:
I've got to come in for those one
or two innings or one or two

493
00:38:57.710 --> 00:39:00.590
JEREMY AFFELDT:
batters and make the
best pitches possible.

494
00:39:01.730 --> 00:39:02.130
COMMENTATOR:
Got him.

495
00:39:03.200 --> 00:39:07.220
ANNOUNCER:
Was the third lowest ERA
in post season history, Jeremy's

496
00:39:07.220 --> 00:39:10.250
ANNOUNCER:
dominance during the playoffs
cannot be overlooked.

497
00:39:10.750 --> 00:39:11.420
COMMENTATOR:
First the pitch.

498
00:39:11.730 --> 00:39:13.250
COMMENTATOR:
He struck him out swinging.

499
00:39:23.020 --> 00:39:25.420
JEREMY AFFELDT:
This is my third
experience in Cincinnati.

500
00:39:26.680 --> 00:39:29.580
This one's looks like there's a
lot more smiles than my other

501
00:39:29.580 --> 00:39:33.850
two. My first one was when I
played here and we lost what was

502
00:39:33.850 --> 00:39:35.770
a hundred games. There wasn't
a lot of smiles around

503
00:39:35.770 --> 00:39:36.430
Cincinnati.

504
00:39:37.210 --> 00:39:38.980
My second one was in 2012.

505
00:39:39.970 --> 00:39:42.740
You guys were all smiles until
we hurt your feelings in the

506
00:39:42.780 --> 00:39:44.770
NLDS and took three
games straight from you.

507
00:39:45.310 --> 00:39:46.700
We went on to
win a World Championship.

508
00:39:46.720 --> 00:39:47.980
We got a really nice
ring out of it.

509
00:39:48.850 --> 00:39:52.150
So I, on the behalf the San
Francisco Giants, thank you and the

510
00:39:52.150 --> 00:39:55.870
fans and all the athletes that tanked
the series to let us go

511
00:39:55.870 --> 00:39:57.600
on. Appreciate that.

512
00:39:57.850 --> 00:40:01.780
So it allows me to come up
here and talk and feel good about

513
00:40:01.780 --> 00:40:05.090
myself with my chest up a
little bit more than it was.

514
00:40:05.240 --> 00:40:05.680
So.

515
00:40:06.580 --> 00:40:10.690
No, about twenty two years of age
I made it to the Major

516
00:40:10.690 --> 00:40:13.180
Leagues. It was a
great experience for me.

517
00:40:13.190 --> 00:40:15.910
I accomplished a dream because at 12
years of age I was sitting

518
00:40:15.910 --> 00:40:18.910
in the Oakland Coliseum, it was
one of my first baseball games

519
00:40:18.910 --> 00:40:22.330
that I ever got to
see watching the Oakland A's.

520
00:40:22.330 --> 00:40:25.150
And my favorite pitcher that I used
to watch on TV was Dave

521
00:40:25.150 --> 00:40:28.240
Stewart. So he was pitching that day
and so my dad got got us

522
00:40:28.240 --> 00:40:31.630
some really good seats like right
in the lower part of the

523
00:40:31.630 --> 00:40:35.380
stadium. And you're right with all
the players I mean they look

524
00:40:35.380 --> 00:40:38.950
mad. I mean all my favorite
guys were there Mark McGuire, Jose

525
00:40:38.950 --> 00:40:40.260
Canseco, Dave Stewart.

526
00:40:40.630 --> 00:40:42.430
You're just looking all these
guys and you're looking around,

527
00:40:42.430 --> 00:40:43.750
Carney Lanceford, you
look at all

528
00:40:43.750 --> 00:40:45.390
these guys, you're like, "Man,
they are massive." They're

529
00:40:47.450 --> 00:40:50.140
massive for a reason that we now
know why they were a little

530
00:40:50.140 --> 00:40:52.180
bigger than they probably
should have been.

531
00:40:53.770 --> 00:40:55.990
they weren't drinking protein shakes,
I can promise you

532
00:40:55.990 --> 00:40:56.310
that. [laughter]

533
00:40:57.370 --> 00:41:01.000
But they were still big and gigantic
and it was just like an

534
00:41:01.090 --> 00:41:03.070
awesome thing to see. And

535
00:41:03.070 --> 00:41:06.130
I remember looking at my dad and
I said, "Dad, I'm going to

536
00:41:06.130 --> 00:41:07.750
play here one day." And

537
00:41:07.750 --> 00:41:08.770
he looked at me he goes, "What?"

538
00:41:09.420 --> 00:41:10.510
I said, "I'm going to play here.

539
00:41:10.530 --> 00:41:11.920
I going to be
amazing baseball player."

540
00:41:12.610 --> 00:41:14.650
He said, "You're going to be
a major league baseball player?`

541
00:41:14.650 --> 00:41:15.400
I said, "Yes, sir."

542
00:41:15.730 --> 00:41:17.080
I said, "I'm a
play on that field.'

543
00:41:18.040 --> 00:41:20.500
And he patted me on the
head like all good dads

544
00:41:20.500 --> 00:41:21.830
do and said, "Go for it, kiddo."

545
00:41:22.480 --> 00:41:25.120
And he didn't put me
in any baseball camps.

546
00:41:25.150 --> 00:41:26.920
He just let me
go play baseball. And

547
00:41:27.640 --> 00:41:29.770
then when I was twenty two years
of age I walked in the

548
00:41:29.770 --> 00:41:33.370
Coliseum through Centerfield where the bus
dropped us off and I

549
00:41:33.370 --> 00:41:34.880
got my little Nokia phone out.

550
00:41:35.680 --> 00:41:37.420
And you guys remember that Nokia
phone, man it had like the

551
00:41:37.420 --> 00:41:41.770
snake game, like 1, 3, 7, 9,
all the -- some you generation,

552
00:41:41.770 --> 00:41:42.910
you're an iPhone generation.

553
00:41:42.970 --> 00:41:45.790
Well my generation our game was the
worm game and you had to

554
00:41:45.790 --> 00:41:48.910
chase this little dot around the circle
and he had to do it so

555
00:41:48.910 --> 00:41:51.370
many times and try not to
hit your tail end. You

556
00:41:51.370 --> 00:41:53.680
know? And all we have
is 1, 3, 7, 9.

557
00:41:53.710 --> 00:41:56.440
We didn't draw on a screen, so it
was kind of -- it was a fun

558
00:41:56.440 --> 00:41:57.790
game and you got mad. And

559
00:41:58.000 --> 00:42:00.460
you could actually throw that phone
down and the screen didn't

560
00:42:00.460 --> 00:42:01.810
break. That was
sweet, right? [laughter].

561
00:42:02.410 --> 00:42:04.270
So I got out my Nokia phone.

562
00:42:04.300 --> 00:42:05.110
I said, "Hey, dad."

563
00:42:06.180 --> 00:42:07.860
I called my dad
and he answered. And

564
00:42:07.870 --> 00:42:10.060
he still has a telephone, he
still today has a landline.

565
00:42:10.090 --> 00:42:10.720
It's impressive.

566
00:42:11.140 --> 00:42:14.170
And I said, I said, "Dad," I
said, "Do you know where I"m at?"

567
00:42:14.290 --> 00:42:15.250
He said ,Yeah,
you're in Oakland."

568
00:42:15.820 --> 00:42:17.890
I said, "Yeah, you remember
what happened here in Oakland?"

569
00:42:18.160 --> 00:42:19.330
He said, "What are
you talking about?"

570
00:42:19.930 --> 00:42:22.690
I said, "Dad, I see the very
seats we're sitting in when I was

571
00:42:22.710 --> 00:42:24.570
twelve years old and I said I
was going to pitch here. And

572
00:42:24.570 --> 00:42:25.900
tonight, Dad, I
pitch in Oakland.".

573
00:42:26.740 --> 00:42:27.980
And he hung up the phone.

574
00:42:29.380 --> 00:42:31.090
And I looked at my phone
and I was like, "Man."

575
00:42:31.990 --> 00:42:35.950
So I hit talk again
and my mom answered the

576
00:42:35.950 --> 00:42:37.360
phone. And I said, "Mama,"
I said , "What happened?

577
00:42:37.390 --> 00:42:38.050
I was talking to Dad."

578
00:42:38.080 --> 00:42:39.040
She's like, "He's
crying." [laughter].

579
00:42:40.990 --> 00:42:43.630
He's a military guy, man, he
dropped bombs for a living.

580
00:42:43.660 --> 00:42:44.290
They don't cry.

581
00:42:44.340 --> 00:42:44.820
You know? So,

582
00:42:44.830 --> 00:42:45.460
he didn't want me to hear him.

583
00:42:45.790 --> 00:42:47.020
So she said, "He's crying.

584
00:42:47.110 --> 00:42:48.880
He just just so pumped
that you accomplished your your

585
00:42:48.880 --> 00:42:52.300
dream. And he just couldn't, he
didn't want you to hear him

586
00:42:52.300 --> 00:42:52.660
cry.".

587
00:42:52.690 --> 00:42:54.310
And I was like,
"All right. Well, tell

588
00:42:54.310 --> 00:42:55.900
him I'm here and I'm excited."

589
00:42:55.930 --> 00:42:58.060
And that's when I kind of realized
what I had done, I had

590
00:42:58.060 --> 00:42:59.360
accomplished a dream. And

591
00:42:59.380 --> 00:43:01.210
four years I hated
the game of baseball.

592
00:43:02.080 --> 00:43:02.650
I hated it.

593
00:43:03.160 --> 00:43:06.040
Absolutely hated Major League Baseball,
didn't want any part to

594
00:43:06.040 --> 00:43:06.550
do with it.

595
00:43:06.970 --> 00:43:08.140
It was miserable.

596
00:43:08.500 --> 00:43:13.450
And the problem was is it's a
very lonely feeling when you hate

597
00:43:13.540 --> 00:43:16.630
doing what you do for
a living, especially Major League

598
00:43:16.630 --> 00:43:17.170
Baseball.

599
00:43:17.690 --> 00:43:21.070
Because if I'm a go to you and
I say, "Hey, man, what do you

600
00:43:21.070 --> 00:43:24.130
do?" And you tell me what
you do, whatever you know, zookeeper

601
00:43:24.310 --> 00:43:26.530
or Zoo York or whatever, you
know, you've got the shirt on.

602
00:43:26.560 --> 00:43:30.580
So, you know, so -- it is
a zoo by the way, you're right.

603
00:43:30.640 --> 00:43:33.820
So you know, and I say, "Well,
I play Major League Baseball and

604
00:43:33.820 --> 00:43:34.330
I hate it."

605
00:43:34.810 --> 00:43:36.670
I'm sure you would be like,
"Dude, I totally understand the

606
00:43:36.670 --> 00:43:38.560
feeling. I would hate it too
if I played Major League

607
00:43:38.560 --> 00:43:41.600
Baseball, man. It would
stink so bad, man.

608
00:43:41.620 --> 00:43:44.440
And I just don't even know why you'd
even want to do that for a

609
00:43:44.440 --> 00:43:44.710
living."

610
00:43:44.980 --> 00:43:48.400
You know like I didn't have anybody
I could tell that I hated

611
00:43:48.400 --> 00:43:50.020
the game of baseball. And

612
00:43:50.020 --> 00:43:53.230
it was super scary for me too
because I was like, man, I don't

613
00:43:53.320 --> 00:43:56.140
have anybody I can talk to, no
one's going to relate to me. And

614
00:43:56.140 --> 00:44:00.550
I'm kind of I feel like alone
on an island here and I don't

615
00:44:01.360 --> 00:44:05.500
know who I can -- I don't
even know what I'm doing on this

616
00:44:05.500 --> 00:44:06.400
planet right now.

617
00:44:06.400 --> 00:44:07.930
Why am I in baseball? What

618
00:44:07.930 --> 00:44:08.710
am I called to do?

619
00:44:08.740 --> 00:44:09.760
God, why do you have
me do this? It's

620
00:44:09.760 --> 00:44:10.450
Groundhog's Day.

621
00:44:10.730 --> 00:44:12.460
I go to the field, I
get booed, I get cheered.

622
00:44:12.460 --> 00:44:15.640
I go to the field, get booed and
booed some more and then I get

623
00:44:15.640 --> 00:44:16.370
cheered a little bit.

624
00:44:16.390 --> 00:44:16.660
You know?

625
00:44:16.660 --> 00:44:19.110
I played with Kansas City in early
2000s, we got booed a lot.

626
00:44:19.450 --> 00:44:22.320
So they can't -- Cincinnati now,
think that like every year.

627
00:44:22.780 --> 00:44:26.110
Okay right? So, it
was just miserable right.

628
00:44:26.320 --> 00:44:27.250
It was just a tough deal.

629
00:44:27.640 --> 00:44:30.940
And I remember sitting on my
counter crying, I wanted to go

630
00:44:30.940 --> 00:44:33.670
home. But my wife wouldn't let
me quit because she's like, "You

631
00:44:33.670 --> 00:44:34.690
know you can't quit.

632
00:44:35.470 --> 00:44:37.900
And you know as an athlete you're
not going to do well if you

633
00:44:37.900 --> 00:44:39.670
quit. You gotta
run this gauntlet.

634
00:44:39.700 --> 00:44:40.210
Play it out.

635
00:44:40.440 --> 00:44:41.070
I'm here for you.".

636
00:44:41.080 --> 00:44:41.890
And she was here for me.

637
00:44:42.550 --> 00:44:45.480
And I was -- but I was
just so frustrated with doing terrible.

638
00:44:45.630 --> 00:44:47.740
I got put on the DL
one time for a broken fingernail.

639
00:44:47.920 --> 00:44:48.930
That's how it was going, okay?

640
00:44:49.090 --> 00:44:50.260
So it's a really bad deal.

641
00:44:50.680 --> 00:44:52.760
So it was it was
just a miserable time.

642
00:44:53.860 --> 00:44:57.460
And I was begging God
in 2006. I"m like, "Please

643
00:44:57.460 --> 00:44:59.950
trade me, either trade me or
release me, because if you release

644
00:44:59.950 --> 00:45:02.200
me I'ma take the uniform off.

645
00:45:02.320 --> 00:45:04.510
I'm going to go home and say
I gave him my best try.

646
00:45:04.840 --> 00:45:05.470
I didn't quit.".

647
00:45:06.160 --> 00:45:08.770
I said, "But if I can't --
if you're not going to release me,

648
00:45:08.770 --> 00:45:11.080
God, then you got to trade me
cause I've got to get to Kansas

649
00:45:11.080 --> 00:45:13.960
City because it's making me
miserable to be here.

650
00:45:14.290 --> 00:45:15.730
I hate going to work every day."

651
00:45:16.990 --> 00:45:20.920
And five minutes before the trade
deadline on July 31st, 2006, I

652
00:45:20.920 --> 00:45:22.000
got a call from my GM. He

653
00:45:22.000 --> 00:45:24.550
said, "I've just traded
to Colorado Rockies." And

654
00:45:24.550 --> 00:45:29.940
I was like, "Oh, awes--
Oh, that's -- okay. Oh,

655
00:45:29.950 --> 00:45:32.770
man, God, sorry didn't
work out. You

656
00:45:32.770 --> 00:45:34.960
know Dayton, man, I
just tried. You

657
00:45:34.960 --> 00:45:36.850
know, I know you had to do,
you've got to do what's best for

658
00:45:36.850 --> 00:45:39.460
the team and I hope you got
somebody for me," blah, blah, blah.

659
00:45:39.820 --> 00:45:40.410
You know? And

660
00:45:40.420 --> 00:45:41.350
then I told my wife.

661
00:45:41.350 --> 00:45:41.710
My wife said, "What's going on?"

662
00:45:41.710 --> 00:45:42.760
I said, "I just got traded." And

663
00:45:42.760 --> 00:45:44.470
she starts screaming. And

664
00:45:44.470 --> 00:45:46.480
I was like, "Hey, honey, the
GM still on the phone." [laughter]

665
00:45:47.530 --> 00:45:50.380
"Back it -- back it down
a little bit, you know?"

666
00:45:50.380 --> 00:45:51.790
And she's like, "I don't care.

667
00:45:51.910 --> 00:45:53.080
I'm packing your bags. This

668
00:45:53.080 --> 00:45:53.650
is awesome.".

669
00:45:54.180 --> 00:45:55.000
So I'll be all right.

670
00:45:55.030 --> 00:45:57.760
So she's packing my bags and I go
to the field and she meets me

671
00:45:57.760 --> 00:45:58.290
at the airport.

672
00:45:58.360 --> 00:45:59.290
We're flying into Colorado.

673
00:45:59.470 --> 00:46:01.780
And I'm flying in, my wife still
has to get our dog and stuff

674
00:46:01.780 --> 00:46:03.310
packed up so she stay back. And

675
00:46:03.880 --> 00:46:07.180
as we're landing I realized
that there's no gravity in

676
00:46:07.180 --> 00:46:08.490
Colorado, right?

677
00:46:09.060 --> 00:46:11.590
If you understand how -- what
happens in baseball, like when it

678
00:46:11.590 --> 00:46:13.190
gets hit in the air
it's supposed to come down.

679
00:46:13.660 --> 00:46:15.070
If it doesn't it's a homer.

680
00:46:15.400 --> 00:46:17.170
Well, it doesn't ever
come down in Colorado.

681
00:46:17.300 --> 00:46:17.520
Right?

682
00:46:17.590 --> 00:46:20.620
See you try, in fact the first
guy I faced was named a Prince

683
00:46:20.620 --> 00:46:25.030
Fielder. And I threw this curveball
and the first pitch ever

684
00:46:25.030 --> 00:46:27.070
threw in Colorado, I threw a curveball,
he hit it for a homer.

685
00:46:27.820 --> 00:46:30.250
And all I heard was welcome to
Colorado from the -- "Welcome to

686
00:46:30.250 --> 00:46:31.780
Colorado, " from the crowd.

687
00:46:31.800 --> 00:46:33.610
I mean this is getting
worse for me, right?"

688
00:46:33.640 --> 00:46:34.510
It just was not good.

689
00:46:35.200 --> 00:46:38.740
And I remember I was staying in
my hotel and I got up that

690
00:46:38.740 --> 00:46:41.230
morning and the Mermaid was
calling to me, right?

691
00:46:41.440 --> 00:46:44.300
I was like, woo, I gotta
go to Starbucks, you know?

692
00:46:44.380 --> 00:46:49.330
So I was going towards the green
mermaid and I was just walking

693
00:46:49.330 --> 00:46:51.520
down the street just remember
how miserable I am.

694
00:46:51.550 --> 00:46:56.420
I'm like I literally first pitch I
throw I give up a homer.

695
00:46:57.220 --> 00:47:00.430
I'm just -- I don't want --
I just a failure, failure, failure,

696
00:47:00.430 --> 00:47:01.690
failures, non-stop failure.

697
00:47:01.720 --> 00:47:04.000
I don't -- I don't want to
-- I don't want to do this.

698
00:47:04.030 --> 00:47:06.100
And I was just
begging for a way.

699
00:47:06.100 --> 00:47:09.310
I could not -- It's like God
was keeping me in prison and

700
00:47:09.310 --> 00:47:11.560
laughing at me by getting me
traded to Colorado at the same

701
00:47:11.560 --> 00:47:15.580
time, because I obviously wasn't
very specific on my prayer.

702
00:47:15.580 --> 00:47:19.450
And so be specific when
you ask him stuff. Okay?

703
00:47:20.770 --> 00:47:24.220
So, I remember sitting there and
I see this girl sitting

704
00:47:24.910 --> 00:47:26.290
where I'm at this street corner.

705
00:47:26.660 --> 00:47:28.660
I see this girl
sitting across the street.

706
00:47:28.830 --> 00:47:31.320
She's kind of sit in front
of this RiteAid and the Starbucks

707
00:47:31.320 --> 00:47:32.220
right next to it, right?

708
00:47:32.720 --> 00:47:35.820
And she's got this Cup of
Noodles in her hand, dry

709
00:47:35.820 --> 00:47:37.020
Cup of Noodles with
no water. She's

710
00:47:37.020 --> 00:47:38.250
just eat this Cup of Noodles.

711
00:47:38.720 --> 00:47:41.100
So I walk across the street and I
kind of stop and I look down

712
00:47:41.100 --> 00:47:41.910
at her. And

713
00:47:41.910 --> 00:47:44.100
she's got a split lip,
black eye, torn jeans.

714
00:47:45.190 --> 00:47:48.400
She did not have a good
night the night before, trembling. And

715
00:47:48.400 --> 00:47:50.200
there's a lot of street
kids in Denver, right?

716
00:47:50.380 --> 00:47:52.090
There's a lot for
what, they congregate there.

717
00:47:52.660 --> 00:47:56.140
And I just kind of reached
down and touched her on her

718
00:47:56.140 --> 00:47:58.420
shoulder. And she jumped away from me
and I said, "Hey, I don't

719
00:47:58.420 --> 00:47:59.380
want anything from you.

720
00:47:59.830 --> 00:48:01.150
I just want to know if
you want something to eat."

721
00:48:02.090 --> 00:48:03.230
And she said, "Yes, please.".

722
00:48:03.590 --> 00:48:06.020
So I went into Starbucks and
I got that green sludgy

723
00:48:06.020 --> 00:48:08.020
drink, Naked says on it. It's

724
00:48:08.060 --> 00:48:10.940
like it looks really bad, taste
pretty good, right? It just

725
00:48:10.940 --> 00:48:12.270
looks like algae, right?

726
00:48:12.320 --> 00:48:14.780
So I'm like, "I think
I need that for sure.

727
00:48:15.220 --> 00:48:17.300
And then I need whatever
has the most sugar.".

728
00:48:17.810 --> 00:48:19.430
And so she handed
me a blueberry muffin.

729
00:48:20.240 --> 00:48:22.820
Another fun fact: Blueberry muffins
have most sugar at

730
00:48:22.820 --> 00:48:24.200
Starbucks according to
the employees.

731
00:48:24.680 --> 00:48:26.720
So they handed me
a blueberry muffin.

732
00:48:27.410 --> 00:48:31.730
So I walk out, hand it to the
girl, and she looks up and rips

733
00:48:31.940 --> 00:48:33.800
the bag from me. And

734
00:48:33.800 --> 00:48:35.930
she looked and she's looked at
me and said thank you.

735
00:48:37.340 --> 00:48:40.100
And I stared down at her and
it was probably about five or six

736
00:48:40.100 --> 00:48:41.690
seconds, it felt
like 30 minutes.

737
00:48:42.440 --> 00:48:47.990
And it's like our -- we met,
we locked eyes and It's like we

738
00:48:47.990 --> 00:48:49.610
connected in an amazing way.

739
00:48:49.640 --> 00:48:52.310
I just stared at that girl and
she wasn't saying thank you for

740
00:48:52.310 --> 00:48:52.690
the food.

741
00:48:54.190 --> 00:48:56.560
She was saying, "Thank you for
letting me know I exist.".

742
00:48:57.780 --> 00:48:59.880
Because when we see homeless people
at times we get the fake

743
00:48:59.880 --> 00:49:04.740
phone call or temporarily deaf or
we randomly blind and we

744
00:49:04.740 --> 00:49:06.840
can't see them or we'll go
in the other side of the

745
00:49:06.840 --> 00:49:08.370
street. Because it's an
awkward deal right.

746
00:49:08.400 --> 00:49:09.690
Like like it can be awkward.

747
00:49:09.840 --> 00:49:12.210
We've all been in the cities
where homeless people are around,

748
00:49:12.210 --> 00:49:15.000
and it kind of feels weird,
it feels awkward and it doesn't

749
00:49:15.000 --> 00:49:15.630
feel safe.

750
00:49:16.220 --> 00:49:21.190
And when she said that,
see our nice clothes.

751
00:49:21.430 --> 00:49:23.200
I was living in
a five star hotel.

752
00:49:23.650 --> 00:49:26.290
I went to an unbelievable
office called a baseball stadium.

753
00:49:26.860 --> 00:49:28.210
I had a wife at a home.

754
00:49:28.930 --> 00:49:31.570
I didn't have problems with bills and
knew -- I ate at nice

755
00:49:31.570 --> 00:49:35.650
restaurants. And I looked at that
girl and she didn't have nice

756
00:49:35.650 --> 00:49:37.310
clothes. She didn't have a job.

757
00:49:38.250 --> 00:49:42.720
She didn't have anywhere to live,
yet our realities were the

758
00:49:42.720 --> 00:49:44.430
same because we were both lost.

759
00:49:44.480 --> 00:49:45.480
We're both lonely.

760
00:49:45.810 --> 00:49:48.400
We're both scared and we neither of
us had anyone to talk to

761
00:49:49.170 --> 00:49:50.190
about our current state.

762
00:49:51.520 --> 00:49:54.820
And I remember when she said thank
you, it was thank you for

763
00:49:54.820 --> 00:49:57.940
letting me know I existed and
that was something I needed so

764
00:49:57.940 --> 00:50:02.530
bad at that moment was to be
able to be something for somebody

765
00:50:03.250 --> 00:50:05.920
because I didn't feel like I
was being anything for anybody.

766
00:50:07.420 --> 00:50:09.140
And I needed God
to encourage me.

767
00:50:10.290 --> 00:50:12.720
And He traded me and He put me
in front of that girl that day

768
00:50:12.720 --> 00:50:14.220
for a reason, because
it changed my life.

769
00:50:14.250 --> 00:50:17.130
If you flip over my baseball
card, my baseball card all the

770
00:50:17.130 --> 00:50:18.380
numbers all of the
sudden get really good.

771
00:50:18.410 --> 00:50:21.090
And I'm not saying He all of
the sudden just sort of blessed me.

772
00:50:21.540 --> 00:50:22.710
I think he was always there. M

773
00:50:22.710 --> 00:50:24.150
my talent was always there.

774
00:50:24.210 --> 00:50:26.430
My ability to succeed was
always there., I just didn't

775
00:50:26.430 --> 00:50:27.430
have a reason to do it.

776
00:50:29.200 --> 00:50:33.850
I didn't have that desire to why
I was a baseball player. What

777
00:50:33.850 --> 00:50:35.500
was I a baseball
player for? What

778
00:50:35.500 --> 00:50:37.820
was I gifted to be
a Major League Baseball for?

779
00:50:37.840 --> 00:50:40.110
Because if it was to be just
a Major League Baseball player, if

780
00:50:40.120 --> 00:50:42.760
my gifting were just to
be a professional athlete.

781
00:50:43.240 --> 00:50:45.340
It didn't make a whole lot of
sense because I'm not bringing a

782
00:50:45.340 --> 00:50:47.240
lot of impact to anybody.

783
00:50:48.220 --> 00:50:52.040
Except for I'm entertaining America
for $12 dollar beer, you

784
00:50:52.040 --> 00:50:55.990
know, which is cheap nowadays in
the baseball stadiums and a

785
00:50:55.990 --> 00:50:59.500
$30 ticket and $25
parking ticket to park.

786
00:51:00.100 --> 00:51:01.780
And they boo me. And

787
00:51:01.780 --> 00:51:02.620
that's what I'm here for.

788
00:51:02.650 --> 00:51:04.690
THat's not I want to do.
So I went to the

789
00:51:04.690 --> 00:51:09.070
field that day and I felt
so amazing sitting in the bullpen.

790
00:51:09.780 --> 00:51:12.730
I said this -- why do I feel
good for the first time in like

791
00:51:13.140 --> 00:51:15.370
four years I don't feel depressed
to play the game of

792
00:51:15.370 --> 00:51:19.540
baseball. And I went to my hotel
room that night and I did what

793
00:51:19.540 --> 00:51:21.430
I never -- I told my
self I would never do.

794
00:51:22.490 --> 00:51:24.920
I became the guy that just stuck
his fingers in the Bible and is

795
00:51:24.920 --> 00:51:27.090
like open it up and thought
God would talk to you.

796
00:51:27.530 --> 00:51:28.760
Some of you had
done it like. [laughter]

797
00:51:30.160 --> 00:51:34.010
You know and then you're like
looking down, you know? And

798
00:51:34.130 --> 00:51:35.630
I've tried it multiple times.

799
00:51:35.720 --> 00:51:39.140
It's never really worked, but -- because
then you open it up and

800
00:51:39.140 --> 00:51:41.060
all sin is like
death becomes you. And

801
00:51:41.060 --> 00:51:41.320
you're like, "Oh.

802
00:51:41.330 --> 00:51:42.420
that's great. That's

803
00:51:42.530 --> 00:51:43.120
what I needed.".

804
00:51:43.310 --> 00:51:45.950
You know, you got all these
awkward verses being thrown at you,

805
00:51:46.340 --> 00:51:46.940
you know? And

806
00:51:46.940 --> 00:51:48.590
so you're like, I don't
really know what that means."

807
00:51:50.540 --> 00:51:54.110
So, I did it again because I was
that desperate and I -- And it

808
00:51:54.110 --> 00:51:55.820
worked for the first time ever.

809
00:51:55.850 --> 00:51:57.190
It was like God knew, He
was like, you know what?

810
00:51:57.200 --> 00:51:58.670
I'm not going to
laugh at this time.

811
00:51:58.940 --> 00:52:00.800
I'm actually going to
help him out," right?

812
00:52:01.340 --> 00:52:07.190
And it was Matthew 25, no joke
where it separates the sheep from

813
00:52:07.200 --> 00:52:09.830
the goat when he comes back. And

814
00:52:09.830 --> 00:52:11.820
the guy says, "Well, how do I know
if I'm a sheep and a goat?"

815
00:52:12.770 --> 00:52:14.910
And he says, "Well, when you do
the least of -- what you've done

816
00:52:15.080 --> 00:52:16.850
-- whatever you do to the least
of these you do to me."

817
00:52:16.880 --> 00:52:18.180
He's like, "Well, how do I know
if I'm -- what I'm going to

818
00:52:18.180 --> 00:52:23.120
do?" he's like, "Well have you ever
-- If you don't, you know.

819
00:52:23.130 --> 00:52:25.940
if you don't visit me in prison
or you don't feed me when I'm

820
00:52:25.940 --> 00:52:28.100
hungry or if you don't give
me something, water when I'm

821
00:52:28.100 --> 00:52:31.070
thirsty. You didn't help
me out. So

822
00:52:31.070 --> 00:52:31.660
you're not in."

823
00:52:31.720 --> 00:52:33.290
And he's like, "How do I
know if I did that?"

824
00:52:33.350 --> 00:52:36.380
He goes, "Whatever you did it to
someone who is in prison, to

825
00:52:36.380 --> 00:52:37.430
someone who is hungry.

826
00:52:37.580 --> 00:52:40.520
to someone who is naked, to
someone who is in need.

827
00:52:41.300 --> 00:52:43.700
And if you do it for any
of them, you'll do it for me."

828
00:52:44.860 --> 00:52:47.650
And I remember what I
did for that girl.

829
00:52:48.190 --> 00:52:51.040
And I remember my heart was so pure
and when I did it for that

830
00:52:51.040 --> 00:52:53.650
girl and I felt so good.

831
00:52:54.280 --> 00:52:57.100
It was like I fed Jesus that
day and He fed me back.

832
00:52:58.620 --> 00:52:59.860
And he changed my life.

833
00:53:01.230 --> 00:53:08.100
And I finally understood Luke where
it says, you love the Lord

834
00:53:08.100 --> 00:53:10.560
your God with all your heart soul
and mind and you love your

835
00:53:10.560 --> 00:53:11.940
neighbor as yourself.

836
00:53:12.540 --> 00:53:13.590
They are the same.

837
00:53:15.590 --> 00:53:17.050
And when I'm hungry I
want some to eat.

838
00:53:17.380 --> 00:53:19.070
When I'm thirsty I
want something to drink.

839
00:53:19.970 --> 00:53:22.310
And when I want to go live
somewhere I go to my house.

840
00:53:23.940 --> 00:53:27.350
Right? And when I'm naked I'm
difficultly going to want to put

841
00:53:27.350 --> 00:53:29.260
on clothes, unless it's
Cincinnati, then it's you're

842
00:53:29.270 --> 00:53:30.250
tempted. You know?

843
00:53:30.490 --> 00:53:33.050
to walk around naked, it's way
easier, it's a lot cooler, you

844
00:53:33.050 --> 00:53:33.290
know?

845
00:53:33.740 --> 00:53:37.730
So you know, so you get all
these, you know, you and I remember

846
00:53:37.730 --> 00:53:40.940
feeling that and just God just
saying, "Jeremy, this is what I

847
00:53:40.940 --> 00:53:42.380
want you to do. I

848
00:53:42.380 --> 00:53:45.770
want you to use
baseball as a platform.

849
00:53:45.890 --> 00:53:49.190
Your success will only be the
success that I wanted to be.

850
00:53:49.460 --> 00:53:52.190
If you can encourage others and
show others and give others the

851
00:53:52.190 --> 00:53:54.290
opportunity to have success."

852
00:53:54.970 --> 00:53:56.450
And I said, "How do I do that?"

853
00:53:56.780 --> 00:54:01.190
Do to the least of these what
they need done and give them a

854
00:54:01.190 --> 00:54:04.550
chance to be able to look at
their dad or mom one day and

855
00:54:04.550 --> 00:54:05.840
say, "One day I'm
going to be..."

856
00:54:06.590 --> 00:54:09.350
Because everybody deserves the opportunity
to say, "One day I'm

857
00:54:09.350 --> 00:54:10.220
gonna be."

858
00:54:10.220 --> 00:54:13.070
And everybody who has ever said,
"One day I'm gonna be," that

859
00:54:13.070 --> 00:54:15.320
has had some hard times come
where they weren't able to achieve

860
00:54:15.320 --> 00:54:16.850
it, deserve a chance
to still achieve it.

861
00:54:17.730 --> 00:54:21.670
And I started an organization
called Generation Alive right

862
00:54:21.670 --> 00:54:22.300
after that.

863
00:54:22.750 --> 00:54:25.480
And it dealt with young
people in poverty. And

864
00:54:25.480 --> 00:54:28.120
we now go into schools and we
need to have these action teams

865
00:54:28.120 --> 00:54:29.680
in these public schools,
public high schools.

866
00:54:29.720 --> 00:54:32.290
The only reason I'm able to get
into half of them is because of

867
00:54:32.290 --> 00:54:33.160
what I did for a living.

868
00:54:34.060 --> 00:54:37.120
And I go in and we
start these action teams. And

869
00:54:37.120 --> 00:54:39.970
we basically tell kids to understand
what poverty looks like in

870
00:54:39.970 --> 00:54:40.690
your community.

871
00:54:41.080 --> 00:54:42.430
What does poverty look like?

872
00:54:42.460 --> 00:54:44.680
What are the pains that poverty
causes, and how can we

873
00:54:44.680 --> 00:54:47.560
alleviate those pains through
acts of compassion?

874
00:54:48.540 --> 00:54:50.860
And it's not feeling bad for
the person, it's actually putting

875
00:54:50.860 --> 00:54:53.440
it to action. So you don't
look at someone that's struggling

876
00:54:53.440 --> 00:54:56.380
and be a, "man, that sucks,"
and keep walking. Or too

877
00:54:56.380 --> 00:54:57.550
bad for them, walking. Or

878
00:54:57.550 --> 00:54:59.020
use the religious
jargon, right? "I'll

879
00:54:59.020 --> 00:55:01.480
pray for you," because I'm going
tell you right now, most

880
00:55:01.480 --> 00:55:02.110
people won't do it.

881
00:55:02.880 --> 00:55:03.730
"Yeah. I'll pray for you."

882
00:55:03.730 --> 00:55:05.890
"Uh-huh, yeah. Okay, I'll come back
next week and I'll ask what

883
00:55:05.890 --> 00:55:08.920
your prayer was," because we don't
really know what to say,

884
00:55:09.060 --> 00:55:09.310
right?

885
00:55:10.610 --> 00:55:13.190
Compassion is actually doing
it. When Jesus

886
00:55:13.370 --> 00:55:15.740
hung on the cross, He
carried an act of compassion.

887
00:55:16.690 --> 00:55:19.040
When He fed 5,000 people
are acts of compassion.

888
00:55:20.720 --> 00:55:22.310
So I started an organization
that did that. And

889
00:55:22.310 --> 00:55:24.470
we've in the last five years we've
fed over two and a half

890
00:55:24.470 --> 00:55:26.980
million people and kids have
had to -- [applause}

891
00:55:28.250 --> 00:55:30.860
Yeah. And kids have had -- and
all youth have had to raise the

892
00:55:30.860 --> 00:55:31.190
money.

893
00:55:31.940 --> 00:55:33.690
All kids have had to
raise the money. It's 25

894
00:55:33.710 --> 00:55:34.340
cents a meal.

895
00:55:34.610 --> 00:55:37.220
We also help rescue women out
of human trafficking and create

896
00:55:37.220 --> 00:55:40.340
backpacks and have their personal
things that they need when

897
00:55:40.340 --> 00:55:41.150
they get rescued.

898
00:55:42.050 --> 00:55:45.470
And they share the love of
Jesus with other people and they

899
00:55:45.470 --> 00:55:48.380
feed people they don't even know
because it's a simple act of

900
00:55:48.380 --> 00:55:49.280
compassion.

901
00:55:49.280 --> 00:55:51.650
Because in every community there's
hunger, in every community

902
00:55:51.650 --> 00:55:52.400
who's trafficking.

903
00:55:52.730 --> 00:55:54.890
And now kids are finding other
-- now or action teams are

904
00:55:54.890 --> 00:55:58.670
actually finding other areas that there
is poverty and what is

905
00:55:58.670 --> 00:55:59.900
the pain that poverty causes.

906
00:55:59.940 --> 00:56:01.580
And they're creating
their own ideas.

907
00:56:01.610 --> 00:56:02.720
It's very very amazing.

908
00:56:02.960 --> 00:56:05.630
And I had a kid come up to
me and say, "Why does this feel so

909
00:56:05.630 --> 00:56:08.690
good?" And I said, "Are you
asking me the question, because if

910
00:56:08.690 --> 00:56:10.370
you ask me the question
I'm in a public school.".

911
00:56:10.640 --> 00:56:12.380
So I said, "If you ask me
the question I give it to

912
00:56:12.530 --> 00:56:14.420
you. So are you asking me
why you feel so good?"

913
00:56:15.110 --> 00:56:17.120
They said, "Yeah, why does it
feel so good to do this?"

914
00:56:17.150 --> 00:56:18.890
I said, "Because that's
the love of Jesus."

915
00:56:19.340 --> 00:56:20.270
The kid looked at me.

916
00:56:20.900 --> 00:56:22.190
Right? [applause]

917
00:56:22.190 --> 00:56:25.430
And I said, "It's unconditional love,
and we're all built for

918
00:56:25.430 --> 00:56:26.900
it and we're all born with it.

919
00:56:27.320 --> 00:56:28.270
We just have to find it.".

920
00:56:29.460 --> 00:56:32.310
So my loneliness came from the fact
that I didn't know who I was

921
00:56:32.340 --> 00:56:34.140
and I didn't know why I
was doing what I was doing.

922
00:56:34.680 --> 00:56:37.590
And I got very lonely in an
area that most people would think

923
00:56:37.590 --> 00:56:38.370
you are not lonely.

924
00:56:39.090 --> 00:56:41.880
And it took a young girl on the
street to be able to change my

925
00:56:41.910 --> 00:56:43.530
thought process and God
put her there.

926
00:56:43.900 --> 00:56:46.080
And for the rest of my career
I was not lonely, I was very

927
00:56:46.080 --> 00:56:49.800
fulfilled, three rings to prove
it, just saying, but...

928
00:56:50.710 --> 00:56:50.890
[laughter]

929
00:56:50.890 --> 00:56:53.560
I'm messing with
you. I'm messing

930
00:56:53.810 --> 00:56:54.170
with you.

931
00:56:54.480 --> 00:56:56.290
I've got an extra two minutes so
I thought I'd make a joke.

932
00:56:57.840 --> 00:56:59.370
So I just -- but I
just wanted to tell you.

933
00:56:59.370 --> 00:57:02.280
I said, I've been very fulfilled and
what I did and I know

934
00:57:02.280 --> 00:57:04.300
why I played and I had my why.

935
00:57:05.310 --> 00:57:08.550
And I know who I am and I
know what I played for, and I'd still

936
00:57:08.550 --> 00:57:09.420
do it to this day.

937
00:57:10.200 --> 00:57:14.400
And I love sharing the love
of Jesus through acts of compassion.

938
00:57:14.940 --> 00:57:17.370
And that's how I found
who I was. And

939
00:57:17.370 --> 00:57:19.940
I got to tell my dad at
twelve years old, "One day I'm gonna

940
00:57:19.950 --> 00:57:21.510
be..." And I got
to accomplish that.

941
00:57:21.960 --> 00:57:25.650
And when I retired -- when I retired
my dad was on the field on

942
00:57:25.650 --> 00:57:26.490
my retirement speech.

943
00:57:26.490 --> 00:57:29.730
And I hugged my dad and I said,
"Dad, you gave me the chance to

944
00:57:29.730 --> 00:57:32.070
say one day I'm going to be
and I'm hugging you because I got

945
00:57:32.070 --> 00:57:34.570
to tell you that I'm
happy that I became it.

946
00:57:34.920 --> 00:57:37.020
And I'm a better man for it
and I've got more to do.

947
00:57:37.040 --> 00:57:39.540
It was because of the platform
that you gave me by encouraging

948
00:57:39.540 --> 00:57:42.930
me. And I found my place in
Jesus and my identity in Christ.

949
00:57:43.170 --> 00:57:45.660
And now I can give to
others and love other people.

950
00:57:45.930 --> 00:57:46.440
God bless you.

951
00:57:46.470 --> 00:57:47.260
Thank you for letting me
share with you. [applause]

952
00:57:50.870 --> 00:57:52.250
LENA SCHULER:
Man, How fun was that?

953
00:57:52.310 --> 00:57:55.630
LENA SCHULER:
I hope that something new
was just sparked in you.

954
00:57:56.230 --> 00:57:59.030
LENA SCHULER:
You know we have a team of
people that would love to pray for

955
00:57:59.030 --> 00:58:02.060
LENA SCHULER:
you and who would love
to help connect you.

956
00:58:02.240 --> 00:58:05.030
LENA SCHULER:
So, if you head to the Crossroads
website you can chat with us

957
00:58:05.270 --> 00:58:06.150
LENA SCHULER:
on the website.

958
00:58:06.500 --> 00:58:10.370
And we'd love to get you
connected into a Summer Social near

959
00:58:10.370 --> 00:58:13.010
you. So just head to
Crossroads.net and you can find

960
00:58:13.160 --> 00:58:14.120
all of that there.

961
00:58:14.330 --> 00:58:17.420
We'll see you next week for
week three of Spark Talks.

962
00:58:17.420 --> 00:58:17.430
(music)

963
00:58:17.430 --> 00:58:17.440
CAPTIONS: MAVERICK CAPTIONING
SERVICE, CINCINNATI OH
Process, journal or discuss the themes of this article - here's a few questions to get the ball rolling...

Welcome to the Chaser–a few questions after the weekend service to start conversations. If this is your first time in a group, or your group has new members, take a few minutes and introduce yourself. Two truths and a lie is always a good place to start.

  1. Spark Talks are all about sharing stories to encourage others. You’ve got 2 minutes each to give a quick Spark Talk about the best meal you’ve ever eaten. Ready? Go.

  2. This week we saw three very different stories of healing. Have you experienced or witnessed anything that you would describe as a miracle? Share it with the group.

  3. Is prayer a go-to-response, or a last resort when you’ve needed to be healed? Share why and what your experience has been with prayer.

  4. Is there something–an idea or an experience–that makes it hard to believe God will heal you or a loved one today? Go around and share. No judgement here. Be authentic.

  5. Now were going to be bold. Deep breath. Share where you need healing. It could be physical, emotional, or spiritual. Then, spend time praying for each member of your group to be healed.

    (Don’t worry if the person before you prayed what you were gonna pray. It takes persistence. Even for Jesus. So go for it. Just don’t spit in anyone’s eyes.)

Challenge

Keep. Praying. Every day this week, spend time praying for healing for the members of your group. If someone experiences breakthrough or healing, let each other know! And let us know too. Email us at hello@crossroads.net.

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Jun 30, 2019 58 mins 48 sec

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